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Oscar Flashback: The four films that won four of the Big Five, including ‘Gone with the Wind,’ ‘American Beauty’

Oscar Flashback: The four films that won four of the Big Five, including ‘Gone with the Wind,’ ‘American Beauty’
This article marks Part 5 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following four films that scored a quartet of trophies among the top races.

At the 12th Academy Awards ceremony, this was no stopping Victor Fleming’s blockbuster epic “Gone with the Wind” (1939). With a total of 13 nominations, the most of any film that year, it was the overwhelming favorite for Oscar glory and indeed, on the big night, the picture took home eight prizes, including Best Picture. Fleming, in his lone career Oscar bid, prevailed in Best Director,
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘A Star Is Born’ and Lady Gaga could end 14-year Oscar drought of Best Picture and Actress matching wins

‘A Star Is Born’ and Lady Gaga could end 14-year Oscar drought of Best Picture and Actress matching wins
Will the third time be the charm? For the past two years, we were thisclose to having the Best Picture and Best Actress Oscars go to the same film for the first time since “Million Dollar Baby” (2004). Emma Stone took home Best Actress for “La La Land” (2016) and we all know what happened after that. Frances McDormand cruised to her second Best Actress statuette for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (2017), but her divisive film, which was predicted to win (oops), fell to “The Shape of Water.” And now “A Star Is Born” and Lady Gaga are the odds-on favorites to prevail, which would only be the 12th time ever that Best Picture and Best Actress lined up.

It might be hard to believe, but Picture-Actress matchups were more common in the early days of the Oscars than Picture-Actor; there were four Picture-Actress overlaps to one for Actor before the latter started dominating.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Political Pleasures in Potter’s The Farmer’s Daughter (1947) | Blu-ray Review

Few of director H.C. Potter’s films seem to have endured the tests of time, at least as far as influence. Despite having directed several notable stars through the 1940s and 50s, many of these light comedies or frivolous biopics, unless one is fans of a matinee idol starring in his work, his name doesn’t conjure the same enthusiasm as several of his peers. Notably, he directed Greer Garson in the sequel to her Oscar winning Mrs. Miniver with 1950’s The Miniver Story, and he has a pair of Cary Grant titles worth recuperating (Mr.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Nicole Kidman and Steve Carell could make Oscar history with double nominations

Nicole Kidman and Steve Carell could make Oscar history with double nominations
Since the introduction of the supporting categories at the 9th Oscar ceremony, 11 performers have contended in both acting categories in the same year, with seven of them prevailing in one of their races. At the 2019 Academy Awards, Oscar winner Nicole Kidman and Oscar nominee Steve Carell are hoping to make history and join this exclusive roster of double nominees.

Kidman has earned rave reviews for her turns in “Destroyer” and “Boy Erased.” The former finds her portraying a troubled Los Angeles detective, determined to bring down an old nemesis, while the latter has Kidman in a supporting turn, portraying the mother of a young man (Lucas Hedges) who is pressured into enrolling in a gay conversion therapy program. Kidman has previous Oscar nominations for “Moulin Rouge!” (2001); “The Hours” (2002); “Rabbit Hole” (2010); and “Lion” (2016), winning for “The Hours.”

Also coming on strong this Oscar season is Carell, whose lone nomination to date came for “Foxcatcher” (2014). This year,
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ Won’t Be a Blockbuster, But It’s Rewriting Movie Sequel History

‘Sicario: Day of the Soldado’ Won’t Be a Blockbuster, But It’s Rewriting Movie Sequel History
Like almost every other movie this summer, “Sicario: Day of the Soldado” is a sequel. However, it bears little resemblance to the onslaught of overgrown lizards, animated families, and Marvel brethren; it cost much less, and will gross much less. But what really sets “Soldado” apart is it was never meant to happen.

Sequels are as old as the movies. Comedy silent shorts often built on a continuing set of characters. Rudolph Valentino followed “The Sheik” with the even-bigger “Son of the Sheik.” Douglas Fairbanks went from “The Mark of Zorro” to “Don Q, Son of Zorro.”

In the early decades of sound, studios nurtured franchises that included The Thin Man (six titles), the Hardy Family (16 titles), Dr. Kildare and Ma and Pa Kettle (10 titles). Rarely, studios struck twice on a major success: 1944 Best Picture winner “Going My Way” immediately spawned the even-better “Bells of St. Mary’s,” and 1942 winner “Mrs. Miniver
See full article at Indiewire »

Angela Lansbury: Will ‘Little Women’ win her that Emmy after a record 18 losses?

Angela Lansbury: Will ‘Little Women’ win her that Emmy after a record 18 losses?
Angela Lansbury has lost a record 18 races for acting at the Emmy Awards. But the TV academy has a chance to finally right that egregious wrong this year. In the recent TV adaptation of the Louisa May Alcott classic “Little Women,” Dame Angela shone in the scene-stealing role of Aunt March, the grande dame of the family. Acclaimed character actresses Edna May Oliver, Lucile Watson and Mary Wickes made much of this role in the 1933, 1949 and 1994 film versions as did Oscar winner Greer Garson (“Mrs. Miniver”) in the 1978 telefilm.

The pedigree of this remake of “Little Women” could done much to help Lansbury’s likelihood of winning. It is a BBC/PBS co-production and was presented stateside under the “Masterpiece” umbrella. The adaptation is by Heidi Thomas (“Call The Midwife”) while Vanessa Caswill (Thirteen”) handles the helming.

Lansbury lost every one of her record 12 consecutive Drama Actress bids for “Murder, She Wrote
See full article at Gold Derby »

Mother’s Day: Top 18 best Oscar-winning mom performances ranked, including Shirley MacLaine, Brie Larson

  • Gold Derby
Mother’s Day: Top 18 best Oscar-winning mom performances ranked, including Shirley MacLaine, Brie Larson
How would you like to spend a special Mother’s Day with your Mom? Here’s a suggestion — why not sit down for a couple of hours and watch one of these movies that’s all about mothers, both terrific and horrible? Our ranked photo gallery above includes many fine suggestions, all of which feature an Oscar-winning performance by an actress who plays a mother where that role was pivotal to the plot.

Though there are thousands of films in which one character happens to be a mother, you won’t find them all on this list. Besides the fact that these 18 films contain a maternal performance that won an Academy Award, they show a wide array of what it means to be a mother. There’s the courageous mother, the inspirational mom, the loving mother and even the monstrous mother. Lead and supporting actresses include Shirley MacLaine, Frances McDormand,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Agnès Varda could become 13th person (and first woman!) to win honorary and competitive Oscars in the same year

Agnès Varda could become 13th person (and first woman!) to win honorary and competitive Oscars in the same year
If Agnes Varda wins the Best Documentary Feature Oscar for “Faces Places” on Sunday night, she will become just the 13th person, and the first woman, to take home a competitive Oscar and an honorary award in the same year. This would be in addition to setting the record, at age 89, as the oldest person to win a competitive Oscar.

The French/Belgian filmmaker is already the 31st person to receive an Oscar nomination and an honorary award in the same year. If she wins, she would join a list that includes some of the titans of the film industry. While she would be the 13th person to accomplish this, it would actually be the 15th time that this has occurred, since Walt Disney did it three times. Listed below are the other instances where a person claimed competitive and honorary wins within the same year.

See: Predictions in all
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars flashback: Birthday girl Jennifer Jones (‘The Song of Bernadette’) wins Best Actress [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Birthday girl Jennifer Jones (‘The Song of Bernadette’) wins Best Actress [Watch]
There have been 342 Oscars given out to actors, but only one of them has won on their birthday. Jennifer Jones scored Best Actress for “The Song of Bernadette” on her 25th birthday at the 16th ceremony on March 2, 1944.

Jones received the award from reigning champ Greer Garson (“Mrs. Miniver”), which you can watch in the academy’s recap video above. It was the actress’ only win from five nominations, but none of the other ceremonies fell on her birthday.

See Oscar Best Actress gallery: See every winner in history

Several people have won close to their birthdays: Marie Dressler (1930’s “Min and Bill”), Peter Ustinov (1960’s “Spartacus”), Holly Hunter (1993’s “The Piano”) and Lupita Nyong’o (2013’s “12 Years a Slave”) all got a belated birthday gift from the academy the next day. Dianne Wiest (1994’s “Bullets Over Broadway”) received an early birthday present, winning her second Best Supporting Actress
See full article at Gold Derby »

When co-stars collide at Oscars: Does one win or do they split the vote? Sam Rockwell, pay attention!

When co-stars collide at Oscars: Does one win or do they split the vote? Sam Rockwell, pay attention!
It’s the dream of most actors and actresses to receive an Oscar nomination and, if they’re lucky, to win. But what happens when you’re up against a co-star from the same movie? Does one triumph or do they split the vote? Click through our photo gallery above of all the times this has happened throughout Academy Awards history.

Sam Rockwell and Woody Harrelson both scored Best Supporting Actor nominations for their work in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” It has been 26 years since Harvey Keitel and Ben Kingsley were both nominated for “Bugsy” (1991). Unfortunately for the duo they split their support and Jack Palance won for “City Slickers,” ironically a former victim of vote-splitting against his “Shane” co-star Brandon De Wilde (they lost to Frank Sinatra, “From Here to Eternity”).

See 2018 Oscar Best Picture predictions by experts: ‘Three Billboards’ pulls into tie with ‘The Shape of Water’ as voting ends Feb.
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Three Billboards’ would be first to win Best Picture, two acting and writing Oscars without a directing nomination

‘Three Billboards’ would be first to win Best Picture, two acting and writing Oscars without a directing nomination
With Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor signed, sealed and almost delivered to Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell, and Best Original Screenplay and Best Picture very real possibilities, “Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri” is positioned to do something at the Oscars that hasn’t been done before: win two acting awards, a screenplay award and Best Picture without a directing nomination.

That kind of above-the-line dominance usually comes with a corresponding nomination for Best Director, which historically has been linked with Best Picture. “Elmer Gantry” (1960) nearly pulled this off with wins for Best Actor Burt Lancaster, Best Supporting Actress Shirley Jones and Best Adapted Screenplay for writer-director Richard Brooks. But like “Three Billboards” writer-director Martin McDonagh, Brooks received Golden Globe and Directors Guild Awards nominations before getting snubbed by Oscar. Nominated for five Oscars, “Elmer Gantry” lost Best Picture to “The Apartment” and Best Original Score to “Exodus.”

See
See full article at Gold Derby »

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century
Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Review. Pressed for Time—Christopher Nolan's "Dunkirk"

Nowadays you can just get a ferry or the Eurostar and be there in a few relatively painless minutes, but had you hoped to cross the Strait of Dover from France to England in May 1940, you’d be in for some real hell. You might very well drown, or be crushed by the hull of a listing ship, or scorched alive by burning oil, or bombed, or shot. Or maybe all of these things at once, or in sequence. Worse still, you’d most likely have to do a lot of standing around and waiting for it beforehand. Back then, whatever side of history you were on, be it Axis or Allied, you’d still want to be on the English side of the Strait of Dover. Truly nobody wanted to cross the other way, from England to France. Yet many brave souls did so anyway, to rescue nearly 340,000 soldiers
See full article at MUBI »

‘Five Came Back’: How the Story of Hollywood Directors In World War II Became a Great Netflix Series

‘Five Came Back’: How the Story of Hollywood Directors In World War II Became a Great Netflix Series
Entertainment journalist Mark Harris followed up his well-reviewed 2009 “Pictures at a Revolution” with an even better and more accessible book, the dramatic story of five top Hollywood directors and their roles in producing WWII propaganda films, told over 500 pages: “Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War. The first book was doomed not to become a movie due to prohibitive clip costs. But the urge to open up Harris’s exhaustive research on “Five Came Back” via dramatic documentary shorts shot in the global arena was irresistible — and they were free.

Read More: ‘Five Came Back’ Review: A Cinephile’s Dream Documentary Becomes Enthralling for Everyone on Netflix

There’s plenty of rich footage to choose from: Frank Capra’s “Why We Fight” propaganda, John Huston’s re-enacted “The Battle of San Pietro,” John Ford and William Wyler’s live footage of the D-Day invasion from sea and air,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Five Came Back’: How the Story of Hollywood Directors In World War II Became a Great Netflix Series

‘Five Came Back’: How the Story of Hollywood Directors In World War II Became a Great Netflix Series
Entertainment journalist Mark Harris followed up his well-reviewed 2009 “Pictures at a Revolution” with an even better and more accessible book, the dramatic story of five top Hollywood directors and their roles in producing WWII propaganda films, told over 500 pages: “Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War. The first book was doomed not to become a movie due to prohibitive clip costs. But the urge to open up Harris’s exhaustive research on “Five Came Back” via dramatic documentary shorts shot in the global arena was irresistible — and they were free.

Read More: ‘Five Came Back’ Review: A Cinephile’s Dream Documentary Becomes Enthralling for Everyone on Netflix

There’s plenty of rich footage to choose from: Frank Capra’s “Why We Fight” propaganda, John Huston’s re-enacted “The Battle of San Pietro,” John Ford and William Wyler’s live footage of the D-Day invasion from sea and air,
See full article at Indiewire »

'Five Came Back': The True Story of How Hollywood Helped Win World War II

'Five Came Back': The True Story of How Hollywood Helped Win World War II
Several years ago, Mark Harris began feeling a little self-conscious about a gap in his film-history knowledge. As a journalist for Entertainment Weekly, New York Magazine and the late, lamented Web site Grantland, among others, he'd covered the waterfront of contemporary moviemaking. As an author, his book Pictures at a Revolution dissected the moment in the late 1960s when the last gasp of the Golden Age studio system gave way to what become known as "New Hollywood." Ask him about the works of legends like, say, John Ford and Frank Capra,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

'Five Came Back' Review: Doc on WWII Filmmakers Is a Peerless History Lesson

'Five Came Back' Review: Doc on WWII Filmmakers Is a Peerless History Lesson
Arguably the best documentary ever made about Hollywood and wartime, Five Came Back is nirvana for movie lovers and a real eye-opener for anyone new to the subject. Based on the brilliant, richly detailed bestseller by Mark Harris, this three-part chronicle of filmmakers doing their patriotic duty is receiving a theatrical run while also being available as a miniseries on Netflix. Whichever way you catch it, don't think of missing it.

Subtitled A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War, Harris' 2014 book pivoted between the P.O.V.s
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘La La Land’ Has a Shot at Becoming the Most-Nominated Musical in Oscar History

La La Land’ (Courtesy: Lionsgate)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

It’s beginning to look like La La Land is going to sweep the entire awards season all the way through the Oscars — and to make history in the process. The L.A.-set musical that is chock full of Hollywood magic has been dominating every major awards show thus far and is poised to tie the record for garnering the most Oscar nominations — and potentially wins — for a film ever.

At this point La La Land has bested its closest competition — such as Moonlight and Manchester by the Sea — at the biggest award shows. For the Critics’ Choice Awards it led the pack with 12 nominations (ultimately winning eight of them) and for the BAFTAs it overshadowed the others with 11 nominations (with results coming on February 12). La La Land’s biggest achievement thus far, though, is probably becoming the most-awarded
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Looking Back 75 Years: The War on Film

  • Cinelinx
This month, Cinelinx is taking you on a trip back through time. Join us as we examine how movies have changed over the last 100 years. This week, we’re going back 75 years to 1942.

This article is part 2 of 4 in a series.

Read Part 1 Here: Looking Back 100 Years: The Birth of Classic Hollywood

It was 1942 and the world was involved in yet another massive war. Nazi Germany was in control of continental Europe, and they were pushing into the Soviet Union. In one of the darkest events in human history, the Nazis’ Holocaust efforts were ramped up with the opening of the concentration camps. On the other side of the world, Japan was invading the island nations of the Pacific as they expanded their domain eastward towards the United States. The Us had just entered the war and its first troops arrived in Europe.

The war affected many aspects of everyday life,
See full article at Cinelinx »
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