Beauty Break: Halloween Pin-ups

Apologies that Tfe has been out tricking and treating instead of entertaining you. But please enjoy these Hollywood beauties getting into this highly specific autumnal mood. Happy Halloween Everyone

Paulette Goddard

Myrna Loy, Janet Leigh, Judy Garland, Joan Crawford, Clara Bow and other 'it' girls from Old Hollywood are after the jump with their pumpkins, witch hats, scary books, and cats.
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Complete Hal Roach Thelma Todd Patsy Kelly Comedy Collection

Vintage ’30s comedy returns, with a beautiful blonde, a sassy brunette and elaborate location filming in a bygone Los Angeles. Hal Roach found a good match for his ‘female Laurel & Hardy’ comedy team in gorgeous Thelma Todd and the smart-mouthed Patsy Kelly.

The Complete Hal Roach Thelma Todd Patsy Kelly Comedy Collection

DVD

1933-1936 / Color / 1:37 Academy / 445 min. / Silver Series / Street Date June 26 2018, 2018 / available through Classic Flix / 39.99

Starring: Thelma Todd & Patsy Kelly.

Produced by Hal Roach

Directed by Gus Meins, William Terhune, James Parrott, Nick Grinde, others

Hal Roach made the movie game pay big even back in the ‘teens, when Los Angeles used zoning laws to force moviemakers away from downtown, into the remote ‘suburbs’ of Hollywood and Culver City. Taking a choice piece of Culver City real estate, Hal built a veritable empire of comedy, mostly with short subjects. He helped launch the great Harold Lloyd, invented and
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Showbiz History: Actress Stamps, Beyoncé's Debut, and Tarantino's "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood"

10 random things that happened on this day in showbiz history

1775 The Us Postal System is created. Are there any great movies about mailmen? I'm drawing a blank. Do not say The Postman.

The first movie actress to get a postage stamp would be Ethel Barrymore but she had to share it with her brothers Lionel and John! Grace Kelly was (I believe) the first movie star to get a solo postage stamp. Since that time (in 1993) we've had: Theda Bara, Clara Bow, Zasu Pitts, Marilyn Monroe, Lucille Ball, Audrey Hepburn, Greta Garbo, Hattie McDaniel, Judy Garland, Bette Davis, Katharine Hepburn, Helen Hayes, Ingrid Bergman, and Shirley Temple. Who is next? Any guesses?

More after the jump including Mr Julie Andrews, Pee Wee Herman, and Cate Blanchett...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Jason Schwartzman Lists Condo in Historic West Hollywood Building (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Jason Schwartzman Lists Condo in Historic West Hollywood Building (Exclusive)
Actor, writer, producer, avocational musician and a died-in-the-wool scion of show business Jason Schwartzman, who frequently portrays eccentric and unlikable characters in popular and critically acclaimed indie films like “I Heart Huckabee,” hung an $895,000 price tag on a pint-sized one-bedroom and one-bathroom condo at the Hollywood pedigreed Spanish Colonial Revival-style Andalusia apartment house that’s conveniently spitting distance from the Chateau Marmont Hotel on a particularly coveted block in the heart of West Hollywood, California. Schwartzman, son of “Godfather” and “Rocky” actress Talia Shire and late film producer Jack Schwartzman, not to mention the nephew of Francis Ford Coppola, which makes him Sophia Coppola’s cousin, purchased the 762-square-foot apartment in July 2005 for $600,000.

Arranged around a photogenic cloistered courtyard garden with vibrantly colorful tiled fountains and listed on The National Register of Historic Places, the carefully preserved building was designed by married architects Arthur and Nina Zwebell, built in 1926 and,
See full article at Variety »

The Passion of Joan of Arc

The Passion of Joan of Arc

Blu ray

Criterion

1928 / 1:33 / 81 Min. / Street Date March 20, 2018

Starring Renée Jeanne Falconetti, Eugene Silvain

Cinematography by Rudolph Maté

Written by Joseph Delteil, Carl Dreyer

Music by Richard Einhorn, Will Gregory, Adrian Utley

Edited by Carl Dreyer, Marguerite Beaugé

Produced and directed by Carl Dreyer

For over a century the story of Joan of Arc has been catnip to an army of filmmakers ranging from DeMille to Bresson. Surrounded by meddlesome producers and difficult divas, maybe those weary moviemakers saw something of themselves in the embattled heroine – but no director had better insight into God’s own rabble-rouser than Carl Dreyer.

90 years on, The Passion of Joan of Arc continues to astonish. Combining the grim-faced piety of Renaissance art with the unvarnished intimacy of depression era portraits, Dreyer’s 1928 masterpiece still has the power to transform the lowliest grindhouse into a cathedral.

In 1417 a trio
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Paramount Dedicates Building to Pioneering Director Dorothy Arzner

Arzner: IMDb

With 20 feature credits to her name, Dorothy Arzner is the most prolific female director of all time. History has neglected to give the trailblazing filmmaker her due, but Paramount recently honored the late talent. The studio has dedicated its Dressing Room building on Melrose Ave to Arzner. “Paramount reserves this honor for the most respected of its industry professionals, and Arzner is in excellent company on the lot with other edifices named after such female legends as Lucille Ball, Clara Bow, Marlene Dietrich, Edith Head, Sherry Lansing, Carole Lombard, Mary Pickford, Gloria Swanson, and Mae West,” Deadline reports.

Born in 1897, Arzner decided to pursue a career in the business after visiting a film studio. “I remember making the observation, ‘If one was going to be in this movie business, one should be a director, because he was the one who told everyone else what to do,” she recounted.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Francis Ford Coppola & Paramount Dedicate Studio Building To Trailblazing Female Filmmaker Dorothy Arzner

On Thursday afternoon Paramount dedicated its Dressing Room building on the Melrose Ave. lot to one of the industry’s pioneers: Dorothy Arzner who to this day continues to count the most directing credits at 20 for any female director. Paramount reserves this honor for the most respected of its industry professionals, and Arzner is in excellent company on the lot with other edifices named after such female legends as Lucille Ball, Clara Bow, Marlene Dietrich, Edith Head
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

The Forgotten: James Whale's Zip-up Straitjacket

  • MUBI
The Impatient Maiden (1932) is an almost entirely overlooked film, and it's easy to see why, falling as it does between Frankenstein (1931) and The Old Dark House (1932) in director James Whale's Universal career. Those two films are important classics of the horror field, whereas Maiden is a modest romantic comedy that probably nobody had any particular hopes for. Still, as some of Whale's other, lesser-known movies are getting more attention (The Road Back has been restored, and Whale's own favorite film, By Candlelight, has had recent revivals; I'd like to see more attention paid to The Great Garrick and The Man in the Iron Mask) this one might reward attention—or at least I supposed so.How it came into the world: Universal had bought the novel The Impatient Virgin as a vehicle for fading star Clara Bow, who promptly rejected it. The censors mandated a change of title, despite
See full article at MUBI »

Money Is the Devil: Church Satirized in Enjoyable Early Lubitsch Comedy with Premise Similar to Keaton Classic

Money Is the Devil: Church Satirized in Enjoyable Early Lubitsch Comedy with Premise Similar to Keaton Classic
'The Doll' with Ossi Oswalda and Hermann Thimig: Early Ernst Lubitsch satirical fantasy starring 'the German Mary Pickford' has similar premise to that of the 1925 Buster Keaton comedy 'Seven Chances.' 'The Doll': San Francisco Silent Film Festival presented fast-paced Ernst Lubitsch comedy starring the German Mary PickfordOssi Oswalda Directed by Ernst Lubitsch (So This Is Paris, The Wedding March), the 2017 San Francisco Silent Film Festival presentation The Doll / Die Puppe (1919) has one of the most amusing mise-en-scènes ever recorded. The set is created by cut-out figures that gradually come to life; then even more cleverly, they commence the fast-paced action. It all begins when a shy, confirmed bachelor, Lancelot (Hermann Thimig), is ordered by his rich uncle (Max Kronert), the Baron von Chanterelle, to marry for a large sum of money. As to be expected, mayhem ensues. Lancelot is forced to flee from the hordes of eligible maidens, eventually
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Forgotten Early Female Documentarian and That Talkies Began Long Before 'The Jazz Singer'

'Amazing Tales from the Archives': Pioneering female documentarian Aloha Wanderwell Baker remembered at the San Francisco Silent Film Festival – along with the largely forgotten sound-on-cylinder technology and the Jean Desmet Collection. 'Amazing Tales from the Archives': San Francisco Silent Film Festival & the 'sound-on-cylinder' system Fans of the earliest sound films would have enjoyed the first presentation at the 2017 San Francisco Silent Film Festival, held June 1–4: “Amazing Tales from the Archives,” during which Library of Congress' Nitrate Film Vault Manager George Willeman used a wealth of enjoyable film clips to examine the Thomas Edison Kinetophone process. In the years 1913–1914, long before The Jazz Singer and Warner Bros.' sound-on-disc technology, the sound-on-cylinder system invaded the nascent film industry with a collection of “talkies.” The sound was scratchy and muffled, but “recognizable.” Notably, this system focused on dialogue, rather than music or sound effects. As with the making of other recordings at the time, the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Sfsff: Amazing Tales of the Archives

Sfsff 2017 featured films by or with Paul Robeson, Sergei Eisenstein, Ossi Oswalda, Clara Bow, Priscilla Dean, Lon Chaney, Douglas Fairbanks, Harold Lloyd, Bessie Love, Lloyd Hughes, Wallace Beery, and The Lost World dinosaurs. Amazing Tales of the Archives Fans of the earliest sound films would enjoy the first presentation at this year's Amazing Tales Of The Archives. George Willeman examined the Thomas Edison Kinetophone process with a wealth of enjoyable film clips. Between 1913-1914, sound-on-cylinder invaded the nascent film industry with a collection of “talkies”. The sound was scratchy and muffled, but recognizable. It was notable that this effort focused on dialog rather than music or sound effects. As with making other recordings at the time, the technology was acoustic. The actors needed to stand perfectly still and shout into horns suspended overhead to make their voices record on a wax cylinder, which played back when the film was shown. As expected, the device was plagued by many synchronization errors. I can only imagine the effect this distorted sound had on the audience. Next up was a look at The Desmet Collection from 1907-1916 from The Netherlands. Film collector, Jean Desmet (1875-1956), managed to save not only film but a wealth of posters, programs and other documents. I think this supports my theory that hoarding and saving are not always pathological. The last presentation I found the most inspiring. A female documentarian. In the 1920's, Aloha Wanderwell Baker (1906-1996) practically circled the globe documenting people and places from Turkey to Africa to China. Photos from the era showed her roughing it on airplanes, boats, and caravans, much to the amusement of the locals. Her enthusiasm for film and social anthropology made itself evident by the fact that she was still reminiscing about her travelogs when she was in her 80's. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/).
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Wings Screening With Live Music by the Prima Vista Quartet at Webster University April 14th

“Hello Yank, welcome to a very merry little war. And now how about a wee drop for the King and Uncle Sam?”

The 1927 silent classic Wings will screen at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood) April 14th at 7:30pm. Wings will be accompanied by an original score by the Prima Vista Quartet. Tickets are $10.00

Ticket information can be found Here

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2844369

In 1927, the first Best Picture Oscar went to Wings, a thrilling silent WW1 drama from director William S. Wellman. Wings told the story of poor boy Jack (Charles Rogers) and rich boy David (Richard Arlen) who are in love with the same woman, which causes the two to become bitter enemies. When WW1 breaks out the two are thrown together and quickly become friends, although David is too nice to let Jack know that the girl back home doesn’t love him. Clara Bow
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Tara Palmer-Tomkinson obituary

Television personality and I’m a Celebrity…Get Me Out of Here! contestant who rose to fame as an ‘It girl’ in the 1990s

As a schoolgirl Tara Palmer-Tomkinson dreamed – so she would later tell an interviewer – of riding in the Grand National or becoming a concert pianist. Instead she became a 1990s version of the “It girl” (the original was the silent movie star Clara Bow), famous for being famous.

Partying frenetically throughout the period, affluent and well-connected to the royal family, Palmer-Tomkinson rapidly became a gift for the media, and not just the tabloids. She was glamorous but friendly, accessible and witty with journalists: usually good for a quote and always willing to pose, usually in designer outfits, for photographers, however undignified they made her look.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Final Years of King Baggot – From the ‘King of the Movies’ to Bit Player

The King Baggot Tribute will take place Wednesday September 28th at 7pm at Lee Auditorium inside the Missouri History Museum (Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri). The 1913 silent film Ivanhoe will be accompanied by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra and there will be a 40-minute illustrated lecture on the life and career of King Baggot by We Are Movie Geeks’ Tom Stockman. A Facebook invite for the event can be found Here

Here’s a look at the final phase of King Baggot’s career.

King Baggot, the first ‘King of the Movies’ died July 11th, 1948 penniless and mostly forgotten at age 68. A St. Louis native, Baggot was at one time Hollywood’s most popular star, known is his heyday as “The Most Photographed Man in the World” and “More Famous Than the Man in the Moon”. Yet even in his hometown, Baggot had faded into obscurity.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The best is silence: why Shakespeare in early film is worth celebrating

As a new DVD shows, in rare and innovative early adaptations of the Bard on film – even when condensed – you don’t need to hear the words to feel the quality

The thought of silent Shakespeare can cause confusion, and occasional sniggers. If your memory of Shakespeare from school revolves around quotations, verse form and antiquated vocabulary, then silent adaptations of his plays might seem perverse. The truth, in fact, is that Shakespeare films were hugely important and popular in the early silent period. What’s more, these films can help us trace the evolution of narrative cinema, and show us something about Shakespeare too.

Related: Clara Bow: the hard-partying jazz-baby airbrushed from Hollywood history

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hollywood’s Original “It Girl” Clara Bow Getting A Big Screen Biopic

Hollywood’s original “It Girl,” Clara Bow, is getting her own biopic from the producer of “John Wick.” Variety is reporting that Silver Bullet Media has acquired the rights to David Stenn’s biography, “Clara Bow: Runnin’ Wild,” with plans to bring her story to the big screen. Read More: Watch: 4-Minute Supercut Of Scandalous Footage From […]

The post Hollywood’s Original “It Girl” Clara Bow Getting A Big Screen Biopic appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Clara Bow Biopic in the Works — Which Modern-Day It Girl Will Star?

Clara Bow Biopic in the Works — Which Modern-Day It Girl Will Star?
The term “It Girl” first came widespread usage courtesy of Clara Bow, whose starring role in 1927’s “It” made the actress a worldwide star. Many have followed in her wake, and one way of determining Hollywood’s current It Girl will be seeing who’s tapped to play Bow in the just-announced biopic based on David Stenn’s biography “Clara Bow: Runnin’ Wild.” As first reported by Variety, Silver Bullet Entertainment has acquired the rights to Stenn’s book and is developing a film based on it.

Read More: Cannes 2016: Mary Pickford Biopic ‘The First’ Looking To Cast Hollywood Royalty – Exclusive

“The Clara Bow story is one of the most intriguing stories in all of Hollywood,” said Silver Bullet’s David Silver. “She was an amazing actress and overcame countless obstacles in her rise to stardom. We have wanted to do this project for a long time.” Stenn
See full article at Indiewire »

Clara Bow: the hard-partying jazz-baby airbrushed from Hollywood history

Her charm and energy made her the ultimate ‘flapper’ – but despite her success, Bow would forever be snubbed by the industry’s in-crowd

Clara Bow’s biography could have been a fairy story but instead it is a cautionary tale. This vivacious young woman exchanged the rags and deprivations of her slum childhood in Brooklyn for the glamour and riches of Hollywood, but lived to regret it. In 1921, she was a movie-mad teenager who dropped out of school after winning a talent-spotting contest (“She screens perfectly,” said a judge). The contest earned Bow a trophy and a small film role, but no contract. She still had to tout herself around the agencies and studios, swallowing rejections as she went. “There was always something. I was too young, or too little, or too fat. Usually I was too fat,” she remembered. It was two years before she moved to Hollywood, and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Top Ten Tuesday – The Top Ten Black Dresses In The Movies

The Little Black Dress—From Mourning to Night is a free exhibit currently at The Missouri History Museum (Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri). The exhibit runs through September 5th.

The Little Black Dress – a simple, short cocktail dress—is a sartorial staple for most contemporary women. Prior to the early 20th century, simple, unadorned black garments were limited to mourning, and strict social rules regarding mourning dress were rigidly observed.Featuring over 60 dresses from the Missouri History Museum’s world-renowned textile collection, this fun yet thought-provoking exhibit explores the subject of mourning, as well as the transition of black from a symbol of grief to a symbol of high fashion. You’ll also see fascinating artifacts—from hair jewelry to tear catchers—that were once a regular part of the mourning process. Plus, you’ll have the chance to share your own memories of your favorite
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Oberon on TCM: Actress with Mystery Past Wears Men's Clothes, Fights Nazis

Merle Oberon movies: Mysterious star of British and American cinema. Merle Oberon on TCM: Donning men's clothes in 'A Song to Remember,' fighting hiccups in 'That Uncertain Feeling' Merle Oberon is Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month of March 2016. The good news: the exquisite (and mysterious) Oberon, whose ancestry has been a matter of conjecture for decades, makes any movie worth a look. The bad news: TCM isn't offering any Oberon premieres despite the fact that a number of the actress' films – e.g., Temptation, Night in Paradise, Pardon My French, Interval – can be tough to find. This evening, March 18, TCM will be showing six Merle Oberon movies released during the first half of the 1940s. Never a top box office draw in the United States, Oberon was an important international star all the same, having worked with many of the top actors and filmmakers of the studio era.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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